EMEND and EMEND for Injection, in combination with other antiemetic agents, are indicated in adults for prevention of acute and delayed nausea and vomiting associated with initial and repeat courses of highly emetogenic cancer chemotherapy, including high-dose cisplatin.

EMEND and EMEND for Injection have not been studied for treatment of established nausea and vomiting. Chronic continuous administration of EMEND or EMEND for Injection is not recommended.

Selected Important Safety Information

  • EMEND is contraindicated in patients who are hypersensitive to any component of the product. Aprepitant, when administered orally, is a moderate or dose-dependent inhibitor of cytochrome P450 isoenzyme 3A4 (CYP3A4). EMEND should not be used concurrently with pimozide, terfenadine, astemizole, or cisapride. EMEND for Injection is contraindicated in patients who are hypersensitive to EMEND for Injection, aprepitant, polysorbate 80, or any other components of the product. Known hypersensitivity reactions include flushing, erythema, dyspnea, and anaphylactic reactions. Because fosaprepitant is rapidly converted to aprepitant, neither drug should be used concurrently with pimozide or cisapride. Inhibition of CYP3A4 by aprepitant could result in elevated plasma concentrations of these drugs, potentially causing serious or life-threatening reactions.
  • EMEND and EMEND for Injection should be used with caution in patients receiving concomitant medications, including chemotherapy agents, that are primarily metabolized through CYP3A4. Inhibition of CYP3A4 by EMEND or EMEND for Injection could result in elevated plasma concentrations of these concomitant medications. Conversely, when EMEND or EMEND for Injection is used concomitantly with another CYP3A4 inhibitor, aprepitant plasma concentrations could be elevated. When EMEND or EMEND for Injection is used concomitantly with medications that induce CYP3A4 activity, aprepitant plasma concentrations could be reduced, and this may result in decreased efficacy of aprepitant.
  • Chemotherapy agents that are known to be metabolized by CYP3A4 include docetaxel, paclitaxel, etoposide, irinotecan, ifosfamide, imatinib, vinorelbine, vinblastine, and vincristine. In clinical studies, EMEND was administered commonly with etoposide, vinorelbine, or paclitaxel. The doses of these agents were not adjusted to account for potential drug interactions. In separate pharmacokinetic studies, EMEND did not influence the pharmacokinetics of docetaxel or vinorelbine.

    Because a small number of patients in clinical studies received the CYP3A4 substrates vinblastine, vincristine, or ifosfamide, particular caution and careful monitoring are advised in patients receiving these agents or other chemotherapy agents metabolized primarily by CYP3A4 that were not studied.

  • There have been isolated reports of immediate hypersensitivity reactions, including flushing, erythema, dyspnea, and anaphylaxis, during infusion of fosaprepitant. These hypersensitivity reactions have generally responded to discontinuation of the infusion and administration of appropriate therapy. It is not recommended to reinitiate the infusion in patients who have experienced these symptoms during first-time use.
  • Coadministration of EMEND or EMEND for Injection with warfarin (a CYP2C9 substrate) may result in a clinically significant decrease in international normalized ratio (INR) of prothrombin time. In patients on chronic warfarin therapy, the INR should be closely monitored in the 2-week period, particularly at 7 to 10 days, following initiation of EMEND or EMEND for Injection with each chemotherapy cycle.
  • The efficacy of hormonal contraceptives (including birth control pills, skin patches, implants and certain IUDs) may be reduced during coadministration with and for 28 days after the last dose of EMEND or EMEND for Injection. Alternative or backup methods of contraception should be used during treatment with and for 1 month after the last dose of EMEND or EMEND for Injection.
  • Chronic continuous use of EMEND or EMEND for Injection for prevention of nausea and vomiting is not recommended because it has not been studied and because the drug interaction profile may change during chronic continuous use.
  • In clinical trials of EMEND in patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy, the most common adverse events reported at a frequency greater than with standard therapy, and at an incidence of 1% or greater, were hiccups (4.6% EMEND vs 2.9% standard therapy), asthenia/fatigue (2.9% vs 1.6%), increased ALT (2.8% vs 1.5%), increased AST (1.1% vs 0.9%), constipation (2.2% vs 2.0%), dyspepsia (1.5% vs 0.7%), diarrhea (1.1% vs 0.9%), headache (2.2% vs 1.8%), and anorexia (2.0% vs 0.5%).
  • In a clinical trial evaluating safety of the 1-day regimen of EMEND for Injection compared with the 3-day regimen of EMEND, the safety profile was generally similar to that seen in prior highly emetogenic chemotherapy studies with aprepitant. However, infusion-site reactions occurred at a higher incidence in patients who received fosaprepitant (3.0%) than in those who received aprepitant (0.5%). Those infusion-site reactions included infusion-site erythema, infusion-site pruritus, infusion-site pain, infusion-site induration, and infusion-site thrombophlebitis.
  • EMEND is given for 3 days as part of a regimen that includes a corticosteroid and a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist. The recommended dosage includes EMEND 125 mg on Day 1 followed by EMEND 80 mg once daily on Days 2 and 3. The package insert for the coadministered 5-HT3 antagonist must be consulted prior to initiation of treatment with EMEND.
  • EMEND for Injection is administered intravenously on Day 1 only as an infusion over 20 to 30 minutes, initiated approximately 30 minutes before chemotherapy. No capsules of EMEND are administered on Days 2 and 3. EMEND for Injection should be administered in conjunction with a corticosteroid and a 5-HT3 antagonist. The recommended dosage of dexamethasone with EMEND for Injection 150 mg differs from the recommended dosage of dexamethasone with the 3-day regimen of oral EMEND on Days 3 and 4. The package insert for the coadministered 5-HT3 antagonist must be consulted prior to initiation of treatment with EMEND for Injection.
  • In clinical trials, EMEND and EMEND for Injection increased the AUC of dexamethasone, a CYP3A4 substrate, by approximately 2-fold; therefore, the oral dose of dexamethasone administered in the regimen with EMEND or EMEND for Injection should be reduced by approximately 50% to achieve exposures of dexamethasone similar to those obtained without EMEND or EMEND for Injection. EMEND increased the AUC of methylprednisolone by 1.34-fold and 2.5-fold on Days 1 and 3, respectively. The intravenous dose of methylprednisolone should be reduced by approximately 25% and the oral dose by 50% when coadministered with EMEND or EMEND for Injection 115 mg followed by aprepitant.
  • Caution: EMEND for Injection should not be mixed or reconstituted with solutions for which physical and chemical compatibility have not been established. EMEND for Injection is incompatible with any solutions containing divalent cations (eg, Ca2+, Mg2+), including Lactated Ringer's Solution and Hartmann's Solution.

Before prescribing EMEND or EMEND for Injection, please read the Prescribing Information. The Patient Information also is available.

EMEND® (aprepitant) 80 mg, 125 mg capsules and EMEND® (fosaprepitant dimeglumine) 150 mg for Injection