JANUMET® (sitagliptin and metformin HCl) tablets and JANUMET® XR (sitagliptin and metformin HCl extended-release) tablets

 

Tolerability Profile

JANUMET in initial combination therapy

Learn about:

Hypoglycemia


As an adjunct to diet and exercise for appropriate patients with type 2 diabetes:

Established tolerability profile: Similar rates of hypoglycemia with JANUMET vs metformin IR alone1

Percentage of patients with ≥1 episode of hypoglycemia over 24 weeks (APaT population)a

Placebo (n=176) 0.6%
Sitagliptin 100 mg daily (n=179) 0.6%
Metformin 1000 mg daily (n=182) 0.5%
Metformin 2000 mg daily (n=182) 1.1%
Sitagliptin + metformin 100/1000 mg daily (n=190) 1.1%
Sitagliptin + metformin 100/2000 mg daily (n=182) 2.2%

(a) In this study, sitagliptin and metformin were coadministered as separate tablets.

IR = immediate release; APaT = all-patients-as-treated.

Back to top Study design below

When added to a sulfonylurea (glimepiride) or insulin, patients treated with sitagliptin + metformin IR experienced increased incidence of hypoglycemia.a 

16.4% for patients treated with sitagliptin + metformin IR + glimepiride vs 0.9% for placebo + metformin IR + glimepiride and 15.3% for patients treated with sitagliptin + metformin IR + insulin vs 8.2% for placebo + metformin IR + insulin.

A lower dose of sulfonylurea or insulin may be required to reduce the risk of hypoglycemia.

Weight


As an adjunct to diet and exercise for appropriate patients with type 2 diabetes:

Established tolerability profile: Similar weight change with JANUMET vs metformin IR alone1

Weight loss for sitagliptin + metformin vs metformin aloneb

LS mean change from baseline at 24 weeks
(APaT population)
Sitagliptin + metformin –1.3 lb to –2.9 lb
Metformin –1.3 lb to –2.9 lb

(b) In this study, sitagliptin and metformin were coadministered as separate tablets.

IR = immediate release; LS = least squares; APaT = all-patients-as-treated. 

Back to top  | Study design below

When added to a sulfonylurea (glimepiride), patients treated with sitagliptin + metformin IR experienced a mean increase in body weight.

+0.9 lb for patients treated with sitagliptin + metformin IR + glimepiride vs –1.5 lb for placebo + metformin IR + glimepiride.


GI events


As an adjunct to diet and exercise for appropriate patients with type 2 diabetes:

Established tolerability profile: Similar rate of GI events with JANUMET vs metformin IR alone1

Incidence of all GI adverse events for sitagliptin + metformin vs metformin alone over 24 weeksc,d

Data on Incidence of Selected GI Events

(c) Incidence of all GI adverse events: placebo (n=176), 10.8%; sitagliptin 100 mg daily (n=179), 15.1%.
(d) Percentage of patients (APaT population).

GI = gastrointestinal; IR = immediate release; APaT = all-patients-as-treated.

Back to top Study design below

The incidence of selected gastrointestinal adverse reactions in patients treated with sitagliptin and metformin IR was similar to those of placebo and metformin IR: nausea (1.3%, 0.8%), vomiting (1.1%, 0.8%), abdominal pain (2.2%, 3.8%) and diarrhea (2.4%, 2.5%).

Study design

Study evaluating the efficacy and safety of initial combination therapy with sitagliptin and metformin vs metformin or sitagliptin alone: A total of 1,091 patients with type 2 diabetes and inadequate glycemic control on diet and exercise participated in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled factorial study designed to assess the efficacy and safety of sitagliptin + metformin (coadministered as separate tablets of sitagliptin and metformin) compared with respective monotherapies. Patients were randomized into 1 of 6 treatment groups: sitagliptin + metformin 50/500 mg bid (n=190), sitagliptin + metformin 50/1000 mg bid (n=182), metformin 500 mg bid (n=182), metformin 1000 mg bid (n=182), sitagliptin 100 mg once daily (n=179), or placebo (n=176). The primary end point was measured after 24 weeks of treatment.1

bid = twice daily.

Indication

Indications for JANUMET and JANUMET XR:

JANUMET is indicated, as an adjunct to diet and exercise, to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus when treatment with both sitagliptin and metformin is appropriate.

JANUMET XR is indicated, as an adjunct to diet and exercise, to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus when treatment with both sitagliptin and metformin extended-release is appropriate.

JANUMET or JANUMET XR should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus or for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis.

JANUMET or JANUMET XR has not been studied in patients with a history of pancreatitis. It is unknown whether patients with a history of pancreatitis are at increased risk of developing pancreatitis while taking JANUMET or JANUMET XR.

Selected Safety Information

WARNING: LACTIC ACIDOSIS

Postmarketing cases of metformin-associated lactic acidosis have resulted in death, hypothermia, hypotension, and resistant bradyarrhythmias. The onset of metformin-associated lactic acidosis is often subtle, accompanied only by nonspecific symptoms such as malaise, myalgias, respiratory distress, somnolence, and abdominal pain. Metformin-associated lactic acidosis was characterized by elevated blood lactate levels (>5 mmol/Liter), anion gap acidosis (without evidence of ketonuria or ketonemia), an increased lactate/pyruvate ratio, and metformin plasma levels generally >5 mcg/mL.

Risk factors for metformin-associated lactic acidosis include renal impairment, concomitant use of certain drugs (eg, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors such as topiramate), age 65 years old or greater, having a radiological study with contrast, surgery and other procedures, hypoxic states (eg, acute congestive heart failure), excessive alcohol intake, and hepatic impairment.

If metformin-associated lactic acidosis is suspected, immediately discontinue JANUMET or JANUMET XR and institute general supportive measures in a hospital setting. Prompt hemodialysis is recommended.

JANUMET and JANUMET XR are contraindicated in patients with severe renal impairment (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] below 30 mL/min/1.73 m2); hypersensitivity to metformin hydrochloride; acute or chronic metabolic acidosis, including diabetic ketoacidosis; or history of a serious hypersensitivity reaction to JANUMET, JANUMET XR, or sitagliptin, such as anaphylaxis or angioedema.

Postmarketing metformin-associated lactic acidosis cases primarily occurred in patients with significant renal impairment. The risk of metformin accumulation and metformin-associated lactic acidosis increases with the severity of renal impairment because metformin is substantially excreted by the kidney.

JANUMET: Before initiating JANUMET, obtain an eGFR. JANUMET is contraindicated in patients with an eGFR below 30 mL/min/1.73 m2. JANUMET is not recommended in patients with an eGFR between 30 and <45 mL/min/1.73 m2 because these patients require a lower dosage of sitagliptin than what is available in the fixed combination product of JANUMET. Obtain an eGFR at least annually in all patients taking JANUMET. In patients at increased risk for the development of renal impairment (eg, the elderly), renal function should be assessed more frequently.

JANUMET XR: Before initiating JANUMET XR, obtain an eGFR. JANUMET XR is contraindicated in patients with an eGFR less than 30 mL/min/1.73 m2. Discontinue JANUMET XR if the patient’s eGFR later falls below 30 mL/min/1.73 m2. Initiation of JANUMET XR is not recommended in patients with an eGFR between 30 and 45 mL/min/1.73 m2. In patients taking JANUMET XR whose eGFR later falls below 45 mL/min/1.73 m2, assess the benefit and risk of continuing therapy. Obtain an eGFR at least annually in all patients taking JANUMET XR. In patients at increased risk for the development of renal impairment (eg, the elderly), renal function should be assessed more frequently.

The concomitant use of JANUMET or JANUMET XR with specific drugs may increase the risk of metformin-associated lactic acidosis: those that impair renal function, result in significant hemodynamic change, interfere with acid-base balance, or increase metformin accumulation. Consider more frequent monitoring of patients.

The risk of metformin-associated lactic acidosis increases with the patient’s age because elderly patients have a greater likelihood of having hepatic, renal, or cardiac impairment than younger patients. Assess renal function more frequently in elderly patients.

Administration of intravascular iodinated contrast agents in metformin-treated patients has led to an acute decrease in renal function and the occurrence of lactic acidosis. Stop JANUMET or JANUMET XR at the time of, or prior to, an iodinated contrast imaging procedure in patients with an eGFR between 30 and 60 mL/min/1.73 m2; in patients with a history of hepatic impairment, alcoholism, or heart failure; or in patients who will be administered intra-arterial iodinated contrast. Re-evaluate eGFR 48 hours after the imaging procedure; restart JANUMET or JANUMET XR if renal function is stable.

Withholding of food and fluids during surgical or other procedures may increase the risk for volume depletion, hypotension, and renal impairment. JANUMET or JANUMET XR should be temporarily discontinued while patients have restricted food and fluid intake.

Postmarketing cases of metformin-associated lactic acidosis have occurred in the setting of acute congestive heart failure (particularly when accompanied by hypoperfusion and hypoxemia). Cardiovascular collapse (shock), acute myocardial infarction, sepsis, and other conditions associated with hypoxemia have been associated with lactic acidosis and may also cause prerenal azotemia. Discontinue JANUMET or JANUMET XR if this occurs.

Alcohol potentiates the effect of metformin on lactate metabolism and this may increase the risk of metformin-associated lactic acidosis. Warn patients against excessive alcohol intake while receiving JANUMET or JANUMET XR.

Patients with hepatic impairment have developed metformin-associated lactic acidosis. This may be due to impaired lactate clearance resulting in higher lactate blood levels. Avoid using JANUMET or JANUMET XR in patients with clinical or laboratory evidence of hepatic disease.

There have been postmarketing reports of acute pancreatitis, including fatal and nonfatal hemorrhagic or necrotizing pancreatitis, in patients taking sitagliptin with or without metformin. After initiating JANUMET or JANUMET XR, observe patients carefully for signs and symptoms of pancreatitis. If pancreatitis is suspected, promptly discontinue JANUMET or JANUMET XR and initiate appropriate management. It is unknown whether patients with a history of pancreatitis are at increased risk of developing pancreatitis while taking JANUMET or JANUMET XR.

An association between dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor treatment and heart failure has been observed in cardiovascular outcomes trials for two other members of the DPP-4 inhibitor class. These trials evaluated patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Consider the risks and benefits of JANUMET or JANUMET XR prior to initiating treatment in patients at risk for heart failure, such as those with a prior history of heart failure and a history of renal impairment, and observe these patients for signs and symptoms of heart failure during therapy. Advise patients of the characteristic symptoms of heart failure and to immediately report such symptoms. If heart failure develops, evaluate and manage according to current standards of care and consider discontinuation of JANUMET or JANUMET XR.

There have been postmarketing reports of worsening renal function in patients taking sitagliptin with or without metformin, including acute renal failure, sometimes requiring dialysis. Before initiating JANUMET or JANUMET XR and at least annually thereafter, renal function should be assessed. In patients in whom development of renal dysfunction is anticipated, particularly in elderly patients, renal function should be assessed more frequently and JANUMET or JANUMET XR discontinued if evidence of renal impairment is present.

Use With Medications Known to Cause Hypoglycemia

Sitagliptin
When sitagliptin was used in combination with a sulfonylurea or insulin, medications known to cause hypoglycemia, the incidence of hypoglycemia was increased over that of placebo used in combination with a sulfonylurea or insulin. Patients also receiving insulin or an insulin secretagogue (eg, sulfonylurea) may require a lower dose of insulin or the insulin secretagogue to reduce the risk of hypoglycemia.

The incidence (and rate) of hypoglycemia based on all reports of symptomatic hypoglycemia were: 16.4% (0.82 episodes/patient-year) for sitagliptin 100 mg in combination with metformin and glimepiride, 0.9% (0.02 episodes/patient-year) for placebo in combination with metformin and glimepiride, 8.2% (0.61 episodes/patient-year) for placebo in combination with metformin and insulin, and 15.3% (0.98 episodes/patient-year) for sitagliptin in combination with metformin and insulin.

Metformin hydrochloride
Hypoglycemia does not occur in patients receiving metformin alone under usual circumstances of use, but could occur when caloric intake is deficient, when strenuous exercise is not compensated by caloric supplementation, or during concomitant use with other glucose-lowering agents (such as sulfonylureas and insulin) or ethanol. Elderly, debilitated, or malnourished patients and those with adrenal or pituitary insufficiency or alcohol intoxication are particularly susceptible to hypoglycemic effects.

There have been postmarketing reports of serious hypersensitivity reactions in patients treated with sitagliptin, one of the components of JANUMET and JANUMET XR, such as anaphylaxis, angioedema, and exfoliative skin conditions including Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Onset of these reactions occurred within the first 3 months after initiating sitagliptin, with some reports occurring after the first dose. If a hypersensitivity reaction is suspected, discontinue JANUMET or JANUMET XR, assess for other potential causes for the event, and institute alternative diabetes treatment.

Angioedema has also been reported with other DPP-4 inhibitors. Use caution in a patient with a history of angioedema to another DPP-4 inhibitor because it is unknown whether such patients will be predisposed to angioedema with JANUMET or JANUMET XR.

There have been postmarketing reports of severe and disabling arthralgia in patients taking DPP-4 inhibitors. The time to onset of symptoms following initiation of drug therapy varied from 1 day to years. Patients experienced relief of symptoms upon discontinuation of the medication. A subset of patients experienced a recurrence of symptoms when restarting the same drug or a different DPP-4 inhibitor. Consider DPP-4 inhibitors as a possible cause for severe joint pain and discontinue drug if appropriate.

Postmarketing cases of bullous pemphigoid requiring hospitalization have been reported with DPP-4 inhibitor use. In reported cases, patients typically recovered with topical or systemic immunosuppressive treatment and discontinuation of the DPP-4 inhibitor. Tell patients to report development of blisters or erosions while receiving JANUMET or JANUMET XR. If bullous pemphigoid is suspected, JANUMET or JANUMET XR should be discontinued and referral to a dermatologist should be considered for diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

There have been no clinical studies establishing conclusive evidence of macrovascular risk reduction with JANUMET or JANUMET XR.

In clinical studies, the most common adverse reactions reported, regardless of investigator assessment of causality, in ≥5% of patients treated with either sitagliptin in combination with metformin or placebo were as follows: diarrhea (7.5% vs 4.0%), upper respiratory tract infection (6.2% vs 5.1%), and headache (5.9% vs 2.8%). In patients treated with sitagliptin in combination with metformin and sulfonylurea or placebo in combination with metformin and sulfonylurea: hypoglycemia (16.4% vs 0.9%) and headache (6.9% vs 2.7%). In patients treated with sitagliptin in combination with metformin and insulin or placebo in combination with metformin and insulin: hypoglycemia (15.3% vs 8.2%). Other adverse events with an incidence of ≥5% included: nasopharyngitis for sitagliptin monotherapy; and hypoglycemia (13.7% vs 4.9%), diarrhea (12.5% vs 5.6%), and nausea (6.7% vs 4.2%) for extended-release metformin vs placebo when added to glyburide. Other adverse events with an incidence of ≥5% included diarrhea, nausea/vomiting, flatulence, abdominal discomfort, indigestion, asthenia, and headache for metformin immediate release.

Adverse reactions with sitagliptin in combination with metformin and rosiglitazone through Week 18 were: upper respiratory tract infection (sitagliptin, 5.5%; placebo, 5.2%) and nasopharyngitis (6.1%, 4.1%). Through Week 54 they were: upper respiratory tract infection (sitagliptin, 15.5%; placebo, 6.2%), nasopharyngitis (11.0%, 9.3%), peripheral edema (8.3%, 5.2%), and headache (5.5%, 4.1%).

Before prescribing JANUMET® (sitagliptin and metformin HCl) tablets or JANUMET® XR (sitagliptin and metformin HCl extended-release) tablets, please read the accompanying Prescribing Information, including the Boxed Warning about lactic acidosis. The Medication Guide for JANUMET or JANUMET XR also is available.

Reference

1. Goldstein BJ, Feinglos MN, Lunceford JK, et al; for Sitagliptin 036 Study Group. Effect of initial combination therapy with sitagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, and metformin on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care. 2007;30(8):1979–1987.

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